News

Posted on:
10/27/2017

Did you know that the Maine Breast Cancer Support Specialty License Plate benefits Maine Cancer Foundation?  The proceeds from vehicles that are registered with the Breast Cancer Support Specialty Plate are distributed equally among programs across Maine that support breast and cervical health programs, including Maine Cancer Foundation.

The fee to register your plate is $20 in addition to the regular registration fee, and each renewal is $15 thereafter.

Since the programs's inception, MCF has received $551,000!  We are thankful for the BMV in helping us challenge cancer.

Posted on:
10/25/2017

Maine Cancer Foundation has announced a recent funding award of $375,000 to foster the development of a commercially available early test for estrogen negative breast cancer.  Dr. Srinidi Mohan, an assistant professor in the University of New England College of Pharmacy has received a provisional patent for his early detection and disease monitoring method, which uses a marker in the blood to detect the presence of highly aggressive tumors and to help track cancer growth.

This groundbreaking work aligns with MCF’s mission of reducing incidence and mortality of cancer throughout Maine. 

To hear more, check out this month’s Challenge Cancer 2020 package from our partners at WMTW-WV as they interview Dr. Mohan and our own Program Director, Aysha Sheikh.

#togetherwecan #challengecancer2020

 

Posted on:
10/17/2017

According to the 2014 Maine Cancer Surveillance Report, “Maine females have a higher prevalence of breast cancer screening compared to U.S. females.” A portion of the statistic can be contributed to Maine CDC’s Breast and Cervical Health Program (MBCHP), which provides “breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to underserved women” (MBCHP website). Women who qualify receive free clinical breast and pelvic exams at provider locations statewide.

“Last year, we served approximately 3,000 unique Maine women,” said Program Director Maryann Zuremba. “Out of those 3,000 women, we covered 2,682 mammograms. Our program also covers ultrasounds and biopsies if necessary too.”

Posted on:
10/06/2017

In our Snapshots blog series, we turn to Maine Cancer Foundation constituents - from staff, board members and other volunteers, donors, grant recipients and beyond - to share important moments in their lives related to cancer. Our series will paint a broad stroke of the cancer landscape in the state, while narrowing the focus into the rare and intimate moments that bring us all together.

Snapshots #6 is the story of Maine Cancer Foundation’s Event Manager, Julia Bachelder. At 23 she found out she was a BRCA 2 carrier, she shares how she navigates through her journey.
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“My grandfather died of breast cancer,” said Julia Bachelder, Maine Cancer Foundation’s Events Manager. Growing up, I knew he’d passed away from cancer, but it wasn’t until I was an adult that I learned he’d had breast cancer. Statistically, women are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, but genetics play a large role in the diagnosis of men. “My dad asked my sister if we wanted him to be tested [for the breast cancer gene],” she reflected. “Some people want to know and some people don’t.” Julia and her sister asked her father to be tested, and they learned he was a carrier.

Posted on:
09/21/2017

For this month's Challenge Cancer 2020 package, our partners at WMTW-TV interview Maine Cancer Foundation grantee, Dr. Paul Han with Maine Medical Center, and Terry Kunjel with Maine Coalition to Fight Prostate Cancer.  

For the month of September Maine Cancer Foundation is focusing on men's health and prostate cancer.  Shared decision making is critical to patient centered health care and can lead to a healthier Maine.  

#togetherwecan #challengecancer2020

 

Posted on:
09/12/2017

In our Snapshots blog series, we turn to Maine Cancer Foundation constituents - from staff, board members and other volunteers, donors, grant recipients and beyond - to share important moments in their lives related to cancer. Our series will paint a broad stroke of the cancer landscape in the state, while narrowing the focus into the rare and intimate moments that bring us all together.

Snapshots #6 is the story of Jon Henry, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer at just 44 years old. His treatment caused life-altering side effects, but even in the midst of challenges, Jon found camaraderie and healing. 

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Posted on:
09/07/2017

While cancer can seem scary, there are things we can do to lower our risk. This month, Maine Cancer Foundation is discussing men's health. Enjoy this helpful infographic from our colleagues at the American Institute for Cancer Research:

Posted on:
09/06/2017

Paul Han, MD, MA, MPH, is the Director of the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation at Maine Medical Center Research Institute. In June 2016, Maine Cancer Foundation awarded Maine Medical Center a $400,000 grant over four years for The Maine Lung Cancer Prevention and Screening (Maine LungCAPS) InitiativeMaine LungCAPS is a multi-institution, multi-disciplinary collaboration of Maine health care providers and stakeholders. Dr. Han serves as Principal Investigator for the initiative, designed to improve the prevention, early detection and treatment of lung cancer in Maine

The month of September is dedicated to men’s health and prostate cancer. In our guest blog series, Dr. Han shares his opinions about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, a blood test used to screen for prostate cancer.

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Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer deaths among US men.  The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is a blood test used to “screen” for prostate cancer—that is, to detect cancer at an early stage, when it can be effectively treated.  PSA testing is currently the only available screening test for prostate cancer, and for many years it has been widely used. 

PSA screening has also been controversial.  It’s not a perfect test because it misses some cancers (leading to false reassurance), and can also produce false-positive results (“false alarms”), which can lead to unnecessary anxiety and prostate biopsy procedures.  And although prostate cancer can be aggressive and lethal, many of the cancers detected by the PSA test will never grow, spread, or cause additional problems. 

Posted on:
08/29/2017

Maine is the most rural state in the nation, which bodes well for scenic landscapes, but proves difficult for residents traveling long distances for cancer care. Connie Garber, former Transportation Director for York County Community Action Corporation (YCCAC), frames the issue to explain the necessity for transportation assistance. “Recall a time when your car was unavailable to you for a day,” she said. “What does this do to your normal course of action over the day? How disrupted was your personal mobility?” This day-in-the-life scenario is easy to conjure for even the most affluent Mainer, and the upset to routine is undeniable.

For thousands of Mainers, lack of transportation is an overwhelming burden. Individual travel needs can be as varied as cancer itself; one person might require short-term assistance to and from radiation treatment (typically lasting just six weeks) because friends or family are unavailable. Another patient might have a disability which requires a specialized vehicle. “There’s no one approach to transportation,” said Garber. “We take it for granted so easily, but there are many permutations to what transportation needs are for people." 

Maine Cancer Foundation is currently funding several cancer patient transportation grants, including one at Lake Region Senior Service, Inc. Executive Director Dana Hanson believes in community-based transportation programs, which he says most effectively address gaps in Maine’s services. Mr. Hanson also notes that Maine has a significant senior population; their needs, including transportation, will only continue to grow in the years ahead.

Posted on:
08/23/2017

For this month's Challenge Cancer 2020 package, our partners at WMTW-TV interview Maine Cancer Foundation transportation grantee, Dean Snell Cancer Foundation (DSCF).

Since 2012, Maine Cancer Foundation has given over $50,000 in transportation grants to DSCF to support cancer patients in Midcoast Maine who travel to and from treatment. 

Your generous support helps ease the burden of transportation costs for cancer patients in our state. Thank you!

#togetherwecan #challengecancer2020

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